About your Search

20130318
20130326
SHOW
Book TV 12
( more )
STATION
CNNW 49
CSPAN2 21
KGO (ABC) 16
MSNBCW 15
CSPAN 12
KTVU (FOX) 12
FBC 11
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 11
KNTV (NBC) 8
KPIX (CBS) 6
SFGTV 6
CNBC 3
KBCW (CW) 3
KICU 3
KDTV (Univision) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 226
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)
and i thank you for your service to the country and for your professionalism in running the fbi. the fbi operates the national and state criminal and background check system. we have to enforece the laws that we have. even the momentary glance at the laws we have proves there are holes in our system that even with adequate enforcement would not keep guns out of the hands that seek to do us harm. i'm focused on the fact that those on the terror watch list do not raise a flag in the system. what are those on the terror watch list and not automatically denied a fire arm from licensed firearms dealer and should it person?s listing on the list be a factor in the denial of a firearm? >> the reason those on the terrorist watch list [indiscernible] one of the factors is listed in the statute. there is legislation being discussed in terms of what more can be done to expand these prohibitive factors or to expand it and other ways the use of nix to bar the sale of guns. >> so a person can be on the terror watch list and yet we have to pass legislation to ensure that a person on that list can't purc
. chairman, i thank you for your kind words this is about the men and women of the fbi accomplished so much in the last decade. i thank you for the opportunity to be here to represent the men and women of the fbi. i also want to start by thanking this committee and result in particular for the extraordinary support you have given to the fbi over the last decade. we live in a time of diverse and persistent threats from terrorists, spies, cyber criminals. at the same time, we face a wide range of criminal corruption. just as our national security and criminal threats constantly evolves, so too must the fbi to meet encounter these evolving threats. we look forward to one additional challenge, this the ability to maintain our current capabilities to these threats during a time of constrained budgets. today, i spent a moment to connect our highest priority, national security and criminal threats. terrorists ruined our top priority, terrace with global reach and global ambitions that seek to strike as at home and abroad. the opera today in more places and against a wider array of targets than the
and what not to present. >> the fbi have been all over him like a rash yet the immigration judge doesn't know this? who dropped the ball? >> good question. we don't know. >> this is the 2002 court documents in which the judge granted chahazeh asylum saying he remained to a group that were hopelessly in debt. >> he helped him fill out the application. it's in her handwriting. >> it was unusual for a federal judge to grant asylum based on a group called hopeless debtors. >> he wshe was a superior court judge for 8 years and a senior analyst for fox news. >> the federal judge concluded he would be tortured or killed when if he went back there. >> in 2007 fbi claims he is a danger to national security. >> he was connected to the hijackers. >> in 2007 the board of appeals reopened chehazeh's case. he had high powered attorneys. >> not only did they assist him he has attorneys working for him free. >> despite numerous requests by fox files for an interview of written statements neither chehazeh or his attorneys would speak to us. in a ruling the day before valentine's day 2013 the board of i
is personal. for former criminal investigator jim bush and retired fbi special agent bob buchowski. >> 3,000 people were murdered. he was definitely part of that conspiracy. >> from the beginning wouldn't really give up anything. nothing about him fit. we knew that. we knew in our gut that there is something wrong. >> he arrived in the united states in july of 2000 from sud rabe. >> settled into the middle eastern community of patterson. >> paterson, new jersey, where 11 of the 19 hijackers passed through before the 9/11 attacks. >> paterson is really the launching pad for the plot. >> it is the only place we can actually connect. we can't put them all together at one time or in one meeting place because they blended in the community. >> it is here that he met up and lived with another key facilitator of the hijackers a jordannian who remains a secret of 9/11 as fox news first reported two years ago. he ran illegal driver's license schemes in new jersey, connecticut and virginia and had apartments in all three states. >> he was part of the criminal network in patterson. >> chiaza had no
the communities -- the communities also would. in terms of training, we have had this discussion about fbi staff training. the train was utilizing stereotypic erroneous information. we brought that to you, and you're telling us, you're looking at, making sure that these things would be eliminated and addressed. since then, i have heard a couple more times that certain regions have been doing that again. i would like an update on that train. in this area. tomade changes to that end my understanding, those changes have been adopted. training meets the appropriate standards. if you have instances that you have heard that is not accurate, i would appreciate knowing it but i have not heard of any such instances. i believe that other entities emulated what we have done in terms of assuring the validity of our training materials curry >> they may have hired contractors to do the training. step to be a serious ensure they follow the rules. >> included a review of any contractors utilizing our allrials to assure that live up to our standards. >> i appreciate that. i'm going to go back to mr. serrano beca
unsolved mysteries. an unusual appeal from the fbi tonight and a $5 million reward up for grabs. >>> and later, a beautiful sight making a difference for a lot of kids. >>> it was 23 years ago tonight one of the most daring, certainly the largest art heist ever happened in the isabella gardner museum in boston. tonight the fbi is making an unusual public appeal to get some of the stolen masterpieces back, and there is a $5 million reward up for grabs. our report from nbc's pete williams. >> reporter: it remains one of america's major unsolved mysteries. who broke into boston's gardner art museum march 19, 1990 and slashed 19 pieces of art out of their frames, the world's biggest art heist and property theft ever. three rembrandts and work by monet taken by two men disguised as policemen, who bluffed their way in and handcuffed the two guards on duty. just last year digging up the yard of a reputed mobster, this surprising announcement. the fbi knows who did it and just want the paintings back. >> we believe those responsible for the theft were members of a criminal organization
. but this is the poster he's on now. join the hunt for one of the least likely fugitives ever to make the fbi's ten most wanted list. >> i always thought that he would be caught within a month or two. then a year went by. then two years went by. then five years went by. that can help the fbi bring him in. [ male announcer ] fact: the 100% electric nissan leaf... is more fun than ever. sees better than ever. ♪ charges faster. and will charge. cool. and heat. from your phone. fact: leaf never needs gas. ever. good for the world. built in america. now, leaf's an easier choice than ever. ♪ shop at choosenissan.com. ♪ >>> you've seen them on packaged food, cosmetics, soap, even toothpaste. those long lists of ingredients. thousands of chemicals are in everyday products. and yet what do we know about them? andrea canning decided to have herself and her kids tested for some of those chemicals. the result -- something she didn't expect. >> see these right here? >> reporter: these scenes probably look familiar. a busy mother of three trying to manage dinner. >> chocolate. >> yeah, yummy chocolate. >> repor
-span2, the fbi's top lawyer on how law-enforcement investigations are keeping up with new technology without breaking the law. that's followed by a house appropriations subcommittee looking into agriculture department spending. then "the communicators" with commissioner robert mcdowell. >> the nation's highest court is holding oral arguments this week on to gay marriage cases. the first people got in line thursday, and now the going rate for saving a seat is around $6000. a couple weeks ago director rob reiner explained why this is drawing such interest. here's a portion of what he had to say. >> one of the reasons we took on proposition eight, aside from the obvious reasons of marriage equality and we should all be treated as equal under the law and its, it was a bad initiative, and you know, the courts of our it overturned. we hope the supreme court will uphold those. those rulings. but it was partly an education process. we discover as we go along that, first of all, there's not one person in this audience, or anywhere, that doesn't have a gay person in the family or gay friend or
just briefly is the challenges posed to, frankly the fbi general counsel's office and its problems that i think are general to other general counsel's in the intelligence community as well as doj. and that is really three particular areas that i'm going to focus on. the jones decision from last year going dark which i will describe for those he don't know what that entails, and the problems with cyber initiatives that are going on. and all those i think are examples of the challenges of new technology when we have old law. i think when i look at this, give you my frame of reference when i'm approaching these. i think of a 19th century as industrial revolution i think the 20 century as modern medicine. i think of the 21st century even though we're only 13 years into it as the age of new technology. and the problem i see is that you have 19th, 18th, 17th century borders. you have nationstates with their individual laws, that you have crime that is transcending all that. and so we are wrestling with how do you do with those anomalies and how do you update the law to kc those tensions
a residence hall after they found a body, bombs and guns in a dorm room. the fbi is on the case. >>> the tiny mediterranean island of cyprus. we thought it what's to drain your 401k. now there's been a bit of a rebound on wall street. a bailout could cause worldwide pain. >>> a hijacked helicopter. helped inmates escape from a prison. but they didn't make it too far. that and march madness marshal henderson unless breaking news changes everything on "studio b." >>> first, at 3:00, in new york city, we begin with a fox urgent. the state department confirmed the syrian government that has been killing it's own people today fired rockets into lebanon. the u.s. state department calls that a significant escalation. syrian jets and helicopters fired rockets into the north of lebanon into a town with a sunni population, a population that supports the rebels. at it also comes days after the syrian government reported that a large number of militants crossed into lebanon. this new cross-border attack is the latest sign the civil war reportedly killed more than morn 70,000 people and displaced millions
a mystery for 23 years. >> very interesting. fbi agents say they know who stole the paintings, but they are more interested in getting the artwork back. sean kelly has the latest from boston. ♪ >> reporter: their place on the dutch room wall is still hanging, a 23-year-old reminder of the most significant art heist in history. for the first time the fbi says they know who cut the paintings out and stole a total of half a billion dollars worth of artwork from the isabella stuart museum. >> they developed crucial pieces that confirmed the identity of those who entered the museum and others associated with the theft who belong to a criminal organization. >> reporter: fbi boston's special agent in charge refused to give names adding to the mystery, he wouldn't say if they're dead or alive. >> i'm not convinced. >> reporter: journalist steven kurkjian has invested for almost two decades. >> not on the cusp they're still on the trail. >> reporter: still your favorite mystery? >> it's boston's last best secret. >> reporter: whoever stole the rembrandts, vermeer may have gotten away
white man in a suit seemed to her like an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely she made her way across the lobby into the elevator. at sitting on the seventh floor she spotted a man peering out of one of the doors in the hallway. another man entered the elevator with her and followed her around. suddenly come agents burst out of every room on the floor and converged on hirsh jogging arthu angela davis, are you angela davis? one of them pulled a gun. moments before she realized her capture was eminent, an unexpected unexpected sense of koln. as she pictured the corpse on the hallway carpeting they brought her to the fbi headquarters on east 69th street where she was kept for several hours before driven downtown to the house of detention on sixth avenue and greenwich avenue. esf ten story building the jefferson library stands there now that loom over the town houses and the tenants of the village disoriented as she was coming angeles still recognized it. she had walked by countless times on her way as a teenager and vividly recalled the female inmates as they brought down courses from th
evening, everybody. the fbi has announced an investigation into possible chinese espionage carried out within the walls of nasa. a chinese national arrested saturday by u.s. soil with a 01-white plane ticket to china in possession of potentially highly classified military secrets and space technology. nasa contractor was apprehended at dulles airport carrying several data storage devices including hard drives, flash strives to and computers that investigators say contained highly sensitive information. under investigation tonight for a substantive violation of the arms export control act. congressman frank wolf of virginia chairs the house appropriations subcommittee that is responsible for the funding of nasa. congressman will holding a press conference today to inform the public of the security breach. >> i'm particularly concerned that this information may pertain to the source code for high-technology imaging technology that he had been working on with nasa. this information could have significant applications for the chinese people's liberation army lou: congressman wolf also note
, and that always seemed to me to the clue that is the most interesting. i know the fbi has spent a lot of time trying to figure that out, visiting, talking to associations who are involved with napoleonic memoribilia, to see was there a bounty for one of these? >> reporter: why did the thieves want that flag so badly? is it possible they were given a specific list of artwork to steal by a collector who especially loved those 13 works of art? that brings us to another theory, one that has been made popular by hollywood. >> $1 million, mr. bond. >> reporter: do you think it's possible they're in some private gallery owned by some eccentric billionaire somewhere like the dr. no-type character? >> no. the whole idea that a collector's holding on to stolen magnificent works of art all came from that movie "dr. no." it was a 007 movie, james bond movie from 1962 where james bond is going through dr. no's lair and he sees a painting hanging on the wall. the painting had been stolen the year before. that actually did happen. in 20 years the fbi and five years since then doing these investigations, i h
. the fbi now says it believes it knows who's behind the heist. when it happened, suspicion quickly fell on the museum's security guards. for the first time, one of those guards is sharing his story on camera in an exclusive interview with randi kaye. >> reporter: there was no trace of the thieves. authorities got an idea of what the bad guys looked like from the two night watchmen. the only ones to see the thieves up close. but it all happened so fast. they were tied up and blindfolded within minutes. watchman rick abbott gave this description to his sketch artist. >> the guy who was dealing with me was kind of taller and skinny and wearing gold-framed like round glasses, if i remember correctly. he had a mustache. i remember before he arrested me that it looked really greasy, i remember thinking that. he was using some funky kind of wax on that thing or something like that. it was probably a fake mustache. >> reporter: but the description from rick and the other guard didn't satisfy the fbi. even rick admits the sketch they produced didn't really look like either of the two men. >> i r
developing story in the art world. the fbi says it is getting closer to solving a $500 million heist that took place 23 years ago in boston. nbc news' justice correspondent pete williams is with us now. the fbi says they are making progress. what does that mean in this case? >> well, the reports come from the fbi itself and say they have made progress. they have never arrested anyone but now know who did the actual theft. they are not arresting them. they are not charging it with them because the statute of limitations has long since run. they are members of an organized crime organization that operates in the mid-atlantic and new england but say they've never been able to figure out whatever happened. now they know, based on some tips, that some of the art was taken to connecticut and some was taken to philadelphia and offered for sale ten years ago. they don't know where it is now. so what is this all about? it's all about two things, tyler. number one, they think that whoever was involved in the organized crime theft of these works, that it includes 13 masterpieces, three rembrand
markets were spooked busy bruise planning to tax investors. >>> "wall street journal" says fbi investigation over possible bribery of chinese officials is unfounded. officials say despite the paper's finding the federal case is open. the bribery allegations are tied to a larger phone hacking scandal that's plagued rupert murdoch which includes dow jones. >>> lululemon toppled after news of a shortage of their yoga pants. a shipment of their trademark fabric made the pants overly sheer. >>> new research finds 57% of u.s. workers have less than $25,000 saved for retirement. five years ago only 49% admitted having so little saved. >> so much for those likes. a new study by coca-cola shows it has no measurable impact on short term sales. >>> click away while you can. "the washington post" is set to start charging for additional content this summer. >> when is a station wagon super cool? when it's a corvette. there's an aerowagon concept returning the 2014 stingray into a hatch back. >>> americans by the millions are filling out their ncaa basketball brackets. and just so you can so
from the museum where the art was taken. we'll tell you what the fbi now knows and take you inside the daring crime. >>> we begin, though, with that manhunt now a massive search for a brazen killer who walked up to the doorstep of colorado's prison chief, rang the bell and shot tom clemens dead. cas cas casey buy ant joins us. what's the latest, casey? >> reporter: the latest is, anderson, authorities are asking for help from the public. because they don't have a good sense of who this shooter might have been. the latest bit of information they are pursuing is they're looking for a woman who they describe as a speed walker, who was walking through this neighborhood, she's described as a woman between the ages of 35 and 50 years old, wearing a cap, a jacket, and pants, light-colored pants, exercising through the neighborhood. they say she is not a suspect, but they believe she may have information that could help them potentially identify -- help to identify who the killer might be. they are also looking for a vehicle, a late '80s, early '90s model vehicle described as boxy in natur
, a very vibrant leader from chicago is assassinated in his bed. by the local police working with the fbi. and organizations like the urban league and the naacp turn out in force and protests. here is on the top a rally in new york and on the bottom lima ohio. lima ohio and here is washington d.c.. detroit on the top, new orleans. the new orleans office below philadelphia. omaha. this is just to give you a flavor of some of the sort of spread of the party. so i want to close with just a couple words about why and what that might say more generally about insurgent movements. you know there are different kinds of politics and a lot of political power is built from below. people work with each other and they do organizing work. but there are limits to those kinds of power when it comes to organizing. institutionalized power. usually it is used to build and consolidate power for people in charge of those institutions and so there are many moments in history where people have been able to make a transformative change, not through the slow process of networking and organizing although that has
. there is breaking news on a deadly shooting at a military base home to the fbi training academy. a woman and a man are dead. good morning everybody, i'm bill hemmer. that's where we start in this version of "america's newsroom.". martha has time off. >> good for her. i'm heather childers filling in for her heather: a colonel getting emotional. >> they were all assigned to officers candidates school. all of the candidates in the school are accounted for and safe as we take care of our marines and their families, that are dealing with this tragedy. i would also can for the support of our neighbors, the community, and their thoughts and prayers as well. for our marines who have lost their comrades in arms. heather: marine base quantico is about 0 miles south of washington. bill: sergeant christopher zahn, a marine corps spokesman is with me now. good morning to you. >> good morning, sir. bill: i know this is always difficult. what can you report about what happened last night? >> we have three marines we lost last night which is never an easy day for anybody and i agree with the planning officer's em
of the most famous art heists ever. the fbi saying they think they know who took the paintings in march 1990. brian ross has been tracking the twists and turns in this story since then. and he joins us now. it looks like your long search is finally over. >> getting closer. this has been a 23-year-long game of cat and mouse between the fbi and a long-suspected gang of boston art thieves with ties to local mobsters. this morning, the fbi says there's new hope they're getting closer to cracking the case. the theft was timed to the busiest day of the year for boston police, st. patrick's day. just after 1:00 in the morning with the party still going on downtown, two thieves dressed as police talked their way into the side entrance of the tiny gardner museum of art. in just 81 minutes they had perhaps the largest haul of stolen art in this country ever. there were no alarms and they methodically cut the selected paintings out of their frames. three rembrandts including his only known seascape, the storm on the sea of galile rks. and this masterpiece, lady and gentleman in black. one of only 31 wo
to know what is going on with this investigation. they have heard nothing from the fbi. bill: school bus driver facing suspension for taking a call on the job. now why would she do that? wait until you hear who was calling before you pass judgment here. >> we have these rules, context doesn't matter. there is some, there are some circumstances here warrant taking another look at this. % every year. go to e-trade and find out how much our advice and guidance costs. spoiler alert: it's low. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. e-trade. less for us. more for you. martha: let's go back to our top story now. this all began to break during "america's newsroom" yesterday. now we're getting conflicting account what's really going on inside syria as the civil war there continues to rage. you've got the white house at first saying it had no reason to believe those reports that were coming out, that chemical weapons had been used. something that president obama had said very clearly, that if it happened that would be a red line. it would be a game-changer, change the calculus were his words. just
in somalia. the 31-year-old, a former san diego resident, and 28-year-old from alabama are now on the f.b.i.'s most wanted terrorist list. the two men are members of the terror organization affiliated with al qaeda. one has commanded foreign fighters in somalia. the other gentleman has helped the organization recruit english-speaking young people. >> south korea has a chinese internet address was the source of a large cyber attack. hackers hit the servers of banks and broadcasting companies yesterday morning. we were telling you about that but investigators think the chinese computers were used to hide the true source of the attack with suspicion on north korea which has made throats again the south in recent days. >> from the harlem shake to clips of cute kittens, the huge milestone youtube has just hit thanks to many of you. >> incredible discovery at the bottom of the atlantic thanks to the c.e.o. of a major internet company. amazon's top dog is helping recover some amazing >> the manhunt is on for a serial bank robber in the north bay. look at this surveillance video, the f.b.i. has joined
raising concerns. >> >> the fbi said they know who pulled off one of the biggest art heists in history. the mission they are now focusing on. >> there is new information tonight about a man from maryland that died from rabies after receiving a kidney transplant. the victim was one of four people that received organs from aviation mechanic william small. initially, it was believed that he died of a stomach virus. now, he they said he had rabies and the rabies was transferred to the transplant recipients. >>> new information come to light in the investigation of one of the nation's biggest art thefts almost two decades ago. the took 13 works from a boston museum. they are valued at half a billion dollar. today, fbi and museum officials released this video showing the aftermath of the theft and here, you see the works of art themselves. they released new information on the thieves, saying they are "meet the presses" of a northeast criminal organization who took the art to connecticut and pennsylvania. there is a $5 million reward, no
the possibility it was lost to history under which the fbi was dispatched. the problem is the people who did not speak german or spanish and did not know much about the country's so what did they do? they did what many of us would do, you get your expense account and offer money for information you go to the chief of police and say where are the nazis? that system was riddled with corruption wear a button american dictators realized if you want the nazis this fellow is take him away. i can take his land and returned 4,000 people of german origin and put them in the campaign in texas. what i discovered in the archival records than camp commanders said who are you sending us? their spanish speakers, old men, i found 80 jews who fled germany for asylum then picked up because somebody heard him speaking german and put in a camp? some already knew what it was like to live behind barbed wire by being in a concentration camp. it was a precursor to guantanamo that we operate today. the use of bounty hunters and local sources to ground the people they suspect that they call terrorists that are locked
. >> the fbi launching a campaign recovering art from one of the biggest heights in -- heists in the last 25 years. masterpieces valued at $500 million were stolen from a boston museum 23 years ago yesterday. the fbi says it know who's the thieves are but doesn't know where the art is. agents hope this campaign from the museum will lead to the return of the art work. fbi won't identify the thieves but says there are members of an organized crime group and can't be arrested now because the statute of limitations has run out. >> 10 years ago today the u.s. began invasion of iraq. >> 4400 americans died in fighting and hundreds of billions spent in the cost of caring for veterans will continue to rise. >> mark matthews is here with a look back. >> the bay area was on front lines of the antiwar and the front line, for the invasion. >> if there are three months leading up to the war, hundreds of thousands marched to protest the war. >> lots of rocks and bricks thrown. >> on the day u.s. began bombing bagged dad, they were embedded with a company from california. >> very little time and discussing
of whodunnit. the fbi cracks an art robbery dating back to the 90's. but the price of the art is causing controversey. plus...classics make a comeback. how disney is making money in its revisit to the land of oz, and more. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas good morning.it's thursday, march 21st.i'm angela miles. in today's first look: the dow hit a fresh high on the fed. the blue chips rallied to 14, 547 following the fomc anouncement that interest rates will remain unchanged. the market also shrugged off concerns about cyprus. in the end the dow gained 56, nasdaq up 25, s& p goes for 11 points,gold down 6 and oil up a $1.08 oracle shares took a hard hit last last night, falling around 5% after missing on revenue. and according to a report.. cvs requires its workers to disclose their weight when applying for health insurance or pay a $600 fine for coverage. the company says its insurance program is evolving. joe cusick of optionsexpress joins us now and talk about some fallout from the fed. the market had a
regulars is the court nation that's a very clumsy name edgar hoover and the head of the fbi gave to the british by aberration in america. they preferred a code name that had its root in sherlock holmes gifted amateurs that heated sherlock holmes and his inquiry and the british heard that and referred to themselves as the irregulars. the truth of what they were up to in washington during world war ii is also very tricky to write about because you are writing about spies so you are writing about people who are gifted lawyers would be a polite way to put it to say that they were trained in the arts of deception and of vacation monday and understatement. as a result, when it came to the post war memoirs and interviews they varied widely and meandered often from the truth and it was difficult to almost take anything they said at face value. so unlike many of the books i couldn't take the transcript such interviews and rely on them as wholley factual. with that said, the blame for much of the of gestation and the story lies with the head of the baker street irregulars, the british secu
. the fbi came out, i mean this is incredible. they know, they say, who stole 13 precious art works, valued at $500 billion. they were stolen from isabella's gardener museum in boston in 1990. but here's the incredible thing, people. the fbi won't name the suspects because of the statute of limitations. it's run out. they cannot charge anyone with the theft. okay, so somebody or some people now have a rembrandt and vermier which they can sell on the black market. it's never been recovered. the lesson is this, if you want to steal art, do a good job and keep it hidden long enough and you won't go to jail. i don't know how else to interpret that. >>> the ncaa tournament kicks off tomorrow. we're serious about march madness here at cnn. we have our own bracket challenge. our jay bell says we're not alone. he is founder of pregame.com and tells us more than 100 million people worldwide are expected to wager more than $12 billion on the bracket. it won't be a slam dunk. my bracket will be a slam dunk to beat if you're in any way decent i'm the anti-hoop after all go. to cnn.com/brackets. >>> it'
ahead, our obsession with evil. it is ominous, right? from the hit tv shows to arias mania. the fbi profiler tasked with down killers delves into the dark side. carfirmation. only hertz gives you a carfirmation. hey, this is challenger. i'll be waiting for you in stall 5. it confirms your reservation and the location your car is in, the moment you land. it's just another way you'll be traveling at the speed of hertz. [ dog barking ] ♪ [ female announcer ] life is full of little tests, but your basic paper towel can handle them. especially if that towel is bounty basic. the towel that's 50% stronger. in this lab demo even just one select-a-size sheet of bounty basic is stronger than one full sheet of the leading bargain brand. everyday life? bring it with bounty basic. the strong, but affordable picker-upper. everyday life? bring it with bounty basic. at tyco integrated security, we consider ourselves business optihow?rs. by building custom security solutions that integrate video, access control, fire and intrusion protection. all backed up with world-class monitoring centers, thou
desert training facilities for military. to capitol hill, a hearing underway putting fbi director robert mueller on the hot seat. why congressional investigators have not yet heard from the survivors who were eyewitnesses to the terror attack that killed four americans in benghazi, including our ambassador on 9/11 of last year. chief intel defense correspondent catherine herridge joins us. >> as we wait for the fbi oversight hearing, a short time ago the state department asked whether it would give investigators access to the survivors and the response was noncommittal. >> we have been working with the congress on the benghazi issue, both houses, many committees for months and months and months, and we have been very open it all of their requests and transparent with them about the details in our investigation. >> reporter: the investigation, fox news obtained a letter written by republican congressman frank wolf asking that egyptian authorities stop blocking access to a key benghazi suspect in kay rcairo, any country failing to cooperate with the u.s. and justice is in essence responsi
republicans talk to reporters about the budget. then f.b.i. director talks about how they can end antiterror operations. 4 years ago today we began providing televised access. the c-span networks created by america at cable companies in 1979 and brought to you by your television provider. john morton who heads up immigration enforcement was asked about a house panel about the 2,000 illegal immigrants being held at detention centers. >> the judiciary committee will come to order and the chair has declare recesses of the committee at any time. i want to take the opportunity to make members aware of our new policy regarding participation in sub committee hearings. i was asked if members who are not a member of the sub committee if they are allowed to participate in sub committee hearings. after giving it some thought i came up with some resolution without over burding the sub committees. those who are a member of the full committee may attend and that member can ask questions of the witnesses but only if yielded time by an actual member of the sub committee. i would ask member who is intend to
. and knowing there's always more in the world to see. it's the all-new lincoln mkz. >> shepard: fbi agents announced today they believe they know the identities of the suspects in the nation's largest ever art heist it happened in 1990, half a billion dollars of paintings in boston it happened exactly 23 years ago today. investigators say the thieves dressed up as cops, walked into the isabella stewart gardner museum and tied up the guards. 90 minutes later they are said to have walked out with 13 paintings from such masters as rembrandt and vermeire. the fbi didn't name the suspects at the time. but the fbi now says they are part of an organized crime ring on the east coast. >> for the first time we can say with a high degree of confidence we have determined that in the years since the theft, the art was transported to connecticut and to the philadelphia area. >> >> shepard: agents have had several leads over the year. nothing has panned out as far as we know. enough to they say the crooks recently tried to sell that stolen artwork. two people are dead and several others injured after a p
to take part in the attack, the f.b.i. director was asked whether the agent are getting direct access. >> not yet. >> obstacles in libya, egypt and tunisia, where the embassy was nearly overrun three days later, lawmakers were told u.s. foreign aid exceeds half a billion dollars annually. >> the thought that the government will give that foreign aid and not have the f.b.i. be given access on the individual is unacceptable. >> in letter from republican susan collins on the intelligence committee, the f.b.i. director is asked to identify the suspects and whether any will be extradited to the u.s. for trial. in the house hearing, acknowledged the case faces obstacles from foreign government. >> the question is not necessarily the willingness but the capability. we are working on that. as i say, the investigation is progressing. >> in if case of congressional pressure to make survivors able to investigators the state department is noncommittal about access to its own employees. >> we have been working with the congress on the benghazi issue. both houses, many committees. for months and mo
or the other. >> the fbi agent in charge. >> guilty of two double homicide. >> sheila baltazar. >> he could have killed all of them. >> the supreme court justice. >> not proven. >> the witness. >> guilty. >> camille bell. >> innocent but stupid. >> that first task force detective. >> no maybes, ifs. guilty. the right man for those homicides is in jail. >>> the original audience verdict, guilty. 69%. innocent 4%. not proven either way, 27%. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> hello, everyone. don lemon here and the stories that you are talking about, but first, the day's headlines. president barack obama back home after a busy trip to the middle east and he arrived at andrews air force base after the trip that took him to jordan and the west bank. secretary john kerry did not arrive on air force one. he stayed around to talk to the israeli leader e. >>> the motion to vacate is granted. >>> david ranta spent 23 years in prison for a murd her didn't commit. he was wrongfully convicted of killing a rabbi, and the lawyer says that his client plans to kill the city of new york. >>> and joe
an fbi agent ready to pounce. resolutely, she made her way across the lobby and into the elevator. exiting the seventh floor, she spied a man peering out of one of the doors, another man who had entered the elevator with her followed her out. suddenly, agents burst out of every room and corn verged -- converged on her shouting, are you angela davis? one of hem pulled a gun. moments before when angela realized her capture was imminent, an unexpected sense of calm possessed her. now there was a sickening moment of terror as she pictured her corpse bleeding on the hallway carpeting. they brought her to the sterile fbi headquarters on east 69 street where she was kept for several hours before being driven downtown to the women's house of detention on sixth avenue and greenwich avenue, a massive 10-story brick building -- the jefferson library stands there now -- that loomed over the townhouses and tenements of greenwich village. disor credibilitied as she was -- disoriented as she was, angela still recognized it. she had walked by it countless times and visibly recalled the begin made
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 226 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)